schedule details Your daily lineup.

Worldclass speakers from across the globe open the International Year of Glass 2022 with expert presentations on a variety of pertinent topics

schedule

Social Events

On the 9th of February, The Intercontinental Hotel will play host to the FEVE and GPI sponsored welcome reception where attendees will get the chance to network and celebrate the launch of the 2-day event and the International Year of Glass 2022. 

International Year of Glass Opening Ceremony Schedule

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8.30 - 9.40 AM
Opening Session

Alicia Duran

Opening Session

General Secretary United Nations António Guterres (message)

Spanish Ambassador at UN Spanish Mission in NY, Agustín Santos Maraver

Permanent Representative of Turkey at UN, Geneva, H.E. Sadık Arslan

Minister Plenipotentiary/Deputy Permanent Representative of Egypt

Mr. Ahmed Salama

Science and Technology Counsellor, Permanent Mission of China in Geneva, Mr. SHEN Yanjie

Alicia Durán, chair of the IYOG2022

9:40 - 10:00 AM

Coffee break

10.00 - 10.30 AM
How it all began:  The invention and re-invention of glass in the ancient world

Ian Freestone

How it all began: The invention and re-invention of glass in the ancient world

Beads and small vessels made of strongly coloured, frequently opaque, soda-lime-silica glass were made around the middle of the second millennium BCE in the Middle East. Over the next three thousand years this artificial semi-precious stone was re-invented elsewhere, for example in China and in West Africa, but using other chemical systems. The technological trajectory of glass was critically influenced by the invention of glass blowing in the first century BCE, which led to the development of the transparent and colourless material which is widely understood as glass today.

10.30 - 11.00 AM
Glass: A History of Meaning

Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk

Glass: A History of Meaning

Colour, transparency and fragility are such obvious properties of glass that it hardly seems necessary to point them out. Yet it is these very characteristics which have repeatedly given glass its significance throughout the course of history, a range of meaning and importance that is barely known today. When we look at glass, we are looking at a material with a rich legacy – an amazing story which has been unfolding for 3500 years and which will continue to surprise us in times to come.

11.00 - 11:30 AM
Light in the Public Realm

James Carpenter

Light in the Public Realm

James Carpenter’s keynote will focus upon a 40-year trajectory of work that brings agency to the materiality of glass, using innovative strategies that merge program, performance, structure and light to reveal the unique characteristics of place and to embody a deeper collective experience of nature.

11.30 - 12.00 AM
Glass for Sustainable Construction

Emmanuelle Gouillart

Glass for Sustainable Construction

Glass is omnipresent in construction, where it is associated to light and solidity for glazings, and thermal insulation for mineral wool. I will present an overview of the performances of these materials and systems in construction. In particular, I will focus on how thin films and active technologies can optimize the optical and thermal properties of glazings, resulting in a reduction of heating and cooling energy consumption. Also, I will discuss the roadmap of the flat and insulation glass industries in order to reduce the carbon footprint of glass manufacturing.

12.00 - 1.00 PM

Lunch Break

1:00 - 1:30 PM
Seeing and Sensing the Future: Enabled by Infrared Glass Innovation

Kathleen A. Richardson

Seeing and Sensing the Future: Enabled by Infrared Glass Innovation

Technological advances in areas important to industry, defense and society are moving rapidly with requirements to see and sense in ways not thought possible before. To realize such advances, new materials with unique function can help make new components and systems smaller, lighter in weight, requiring less power and lower cost. Security and sensing systems must be versatile to work in a wide range of extreme environmental conditions such as smoke, fog or in space. Materials that transmit light in the infrared region of the electro-magnetic spectrum allows one to ‘see’ in these regions, often when visible imaging is not possible. This talk reviews general aspects of what infrared glasses and glass ceramics are and how their unique capabilities offer solutions to these challenges.

1:30 - 2:00 PM
The role of glass in 5G communication technology

Naoki Sugimoto

The role of glass in 5G communication technology

The difficulty that high frequency 5G radio waves have in penetrating windows from the outside makes the establishment of wireless communication links indoors hard. A novel technology which guides 28 GHz radio signals received from outdoors to indoors using a meta-surface lens is demonstrated. Glass becomes a window for not only light but also the new generation of radio waves.

2:00 - 2:30 PM
Optical fibre technology

Masashi Onishi

Optical fibre technology

Optical “glass” fiber has been globally installed more than 4billion kilometers and contributed to the high-speed telecommunication networks which realize the current information society. The optical fiber is a “miracle” application that takes full advantage of unique characteristics of the silica glass material. This talk reviews the optical fiber technology from its material and structural points of view with its manufacturing process development history. Also, some surprising performances of the current optical fibers and their future possibilities and challenges are presented.

2:30 - 2:50 PM
Glass and Quantum

Lukas Novotny

Glass and Quantum

Glass has played a crucial role in the development of quantum optics and atomic physics. In the form of lenses, prisms and beam splitters it has allowed us to understand the fundamental properties of light on the quantum level and to manipulate atoms and molecules. I will review the role of glass in quantum science and technology, and highlight recent experiments where light is used to control the quantum motion of glass.

2:50 - 3:20 PM
Making glass visible

Andy McConnell

Making glass visible

I am very lucky for having stumbled into glass, then coming to understand what a wonderful, almost magical substance it is. My first meeting, in 1978, was entirely accidental. I was a rock journalist touring Germany with the American band the Jefferson Starship when a Hamburg antique dealer asked if I could supply his shop with glassware. ‘I’d love too,’ I replied. ‘But I don’t know anything about glass.’ ‘Neither do I,’ he replied. ‘… but together we will learn.’ And that is what happened. I became an antique & vintage glass dealer, 45 years ago. But I’m also a journalist/social historian & have always considered glassware to be a dry subject without consideration of its contents. So, I gradually became absorbed by the evolving aesthetic & technical evolution of fine glass - its applications & ceremonies. My journey has involved visiting many leading fine glassmakers, in the US, across Europe & Australia. I have been constantly amazed by the beauty of glassware & engaged by its designers, makers & processes. But along that road, I also became aware of the incredible enabling powers of other types of glass. Of course, as a wearer of spectacles, I couldn't help but appreciate the visionary power of lenses, without which I would be unemployed and certainly not here, talking to you! Then I became conscious of its role in transforming architecture, medicine, communications. Indeed, I have increasingly enjoyed the feeling that I am standing in a blizzard, absorbing pieces from a vast jigsaw whose image shows the ever-expanding power & possibilities of the marvellous substance that unite us all. So, (raising a real glass of wine) here’s to glass …. CHEERS!

3:20 - 3:40
Glass science in Brazil

Andrea S.S. de Camargo

Glass science in Brazil

Glass research in Brazil is relatively young but ongoing vigorous development. The first laboratory dedicated to the research of this paramount material was established 45 years ago, whereas in 1962, the Brazilian Association of Glass Industries (ABIVIDRO) was founded to promote and intensify the production and use of technical glasses. In 2013, a select group of 14 researchers at three major universities established CeRTEV – one of the world´s largest centers on the globe dedicated to the Research, Technology and Education in Vitreous Materials. Together with other labs in the country, it has placed Brazil among the leading players in scientific and technological output in the area. In this talk, we will give a historical overview and future perspectives.

3:40 - 4:00 PM
Glass: Shaping Lives

Courtney Calahoo

Glass: Shaping Lives

‘Shaping Lives’ discusses Courtney’s experience as a glass scientist and an indigenous woman of Mohawk and Cree descent. From a young age, she was interested in the natural world, leading her to pursue a career in glass science. Her passion for glass has given her self-worth and self-determination, and a chance to bond with people from around the world. She has built outreach programs for indigenous communities in order to increase diversity in science. Scientifically she has focused on chemical bonding in unconventional glass compositions and is currently examining interactions between glass and wood.

4:00 - 4:20 PM

Coffee break

4:20 - 4:35 PM
High-resolution 3D printing and injection molding of fused silica glass

Frederik Kotz-Helmer

High-resolution 3D printing and injection molding of fused silica glass

Glassomer nanocomposites can be processed like a polymer e.g. by casting, 3D printing or injection molding. After the structuring process, the materials are turned into fused silica glass via thermal debinding and sintering. Sintered Glassomer is chemically and physically identical to commercial fused silica glass showing the same high transparency in the UV, visible and infrared combined with the same mechanical strength, hardness and chemical and thermal resistance. Glassomer enables many applications from optics and photonics to life sciences, chemistry and biotechnology.

4:35 - 4:50 PM
Future Opportunities for Glass in Healthcare

Steve Jung

Future Opportunities for Glass in Healthcare

Opportunities for glasses in healthcare are diverse, as the scientific community better understands how this special class of materials interacts on a cellular level. New applications of flexible water-soluble glasses are healing previously non-healing soft tissue wounds. The field of orthopedics is seeing increases in the use of 3D scaffolds made of bioactive glasses to improve bone-grafting products. Glasses are in development as coatings or additives to eliminate biofilm formation on medical devices while other compositions are treating inoperable cancers.

4:50 - 5:05 PM
Photo-Thermo-Refractive Glasses for Advanced Laser Applications

Leonid Glebov

Photo-Thermo-Refractive Glasses for Advanced Laser Applications

Photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass is a multicomponent silicate glass that shows permanent refractive index change after exposure to near UV radiation followed by thermal treatment. This feature enables fabrication of highly efficient and stable holographic optical elements that produce complex spectral and spatial operations with optical beams. These passive glass elements enable dramatic increases of brightness of lasers and resolution of spectrometers.

5:05 - 5:20 PM
Fluoride glass technologies for XXIst century’s challenges

Samuel Poulain

Fluoride glass technologies for XXIst century’s challenges

Fluoride glasses were discovered at the University of Rennes in 1974 and the technology has matured for more than 45 years. The quality of fluoride glass fibers has increased and costs have decreased significantly; this is why more and more fluoride based devices are integrated into scientific and industrial devices. We will describe a panorama of the current and upcoming developments and their potential to answer future challenges in the medical, industrial and ecological fields.

5:20 - 6:00 PM
Glass in space

Falko Langenhorst

Glass in space

Glasses form by various processes in space: space weathering, impacts, and igneous processes. The transition to glass occurs in space either by solid state processes or by melting/vaporisation followed by rapid quench. Despite its metastability, glass in space is sometimes even older than the solar system and thus bears unique information on pre‑solar processes. The talk will address the formation mechanisms and significance of glasses for understanding the processes in space.

19:00 - 23:00

Cocktails and Gala Dinner

An evening of drinks and delicious food, a chance to celebrate and mingle with attendees at the gala dinner hosted by The Intercontinental Hotel

8:30 - 9:00 AM

Mix and mingle

9:00 - 9:30 AM
 Glass – an enabler in life science and pharma

Frank Heinricht

Glass – an enabler in life science and pharma

Asking about life science and pharma nobody would naturally come up with glass as an enabler. But with a closer look it gets rather obvious, that without glass there would be no modern life science or pharma.

Starting with the microscope empowered by Otto Schott with designed optical glasses, this was and is a key still today: from the invention of Penicillin over understanding the cell division mechanisms until latest gene technologies – the indispensable micro insights would not be possible without specialty glass.

Another area for glass as hidden champion is state-of-the-art medical treatment technology: endoscopy or minimally invasive surgery are widely known and applied, but rarely it’s recognized the role of glass in such technology.

Once someone gets a drug injection, it is taken of course as given, that no contaminants or particles come along potentially harming the state of health. Safe drug storage and transportation is prerequisite and there glass is really a hero! But modern pharmacology is continuously challenging glass e.g. in areas like mRNA drugs or individual cancer therapy, so reinventing of glass never will stop.

Therefore one can expect for sure in the future further breakthrough achievements for the sake of human wellbeing!

9:30 - 10:00 AM
 Bioglass: Glass for regenerative medicine

Julian Jones

Bioglass: Glass for regenerative medicine

In this talk, we celebrate 50 years of Bioglass, a material discovered by Larry L. Hench in 1969. It was the first material found to form a bond with bone, changing the mind-set of orthopaedic surgeons. All previous biomaterials had triggered scar tissue formation. Bioglass bonds to bone faster than other bioceramics, and encourages more bone growth, which is attributed to the glass’ dissolution products stimulating bone cells at the genetic level. Bioglass particulate has been used in more than 2 million patients worldwide and is now an active ingredient in toothpaste for sensitive teeth. More recently, Bioglass has been used to fight bone infections; porous scaffolds have been produced; fibrous glasses are used for healing chronic wounds and nanoparticles can be used as delivery vehicles for therapeutic ions.

10:00 - 10:30 AM
 Development and Trends of Glass Innovation Under Global Climate Change

Peng Shou

Development and Trends of Glass Innovation Under Global Climate Change

As materials create a better world, glass ushers in future lifestyles. As a basic functional material with a long history of use, glass connects the macro-universe with microstructures of materials, thus promoting the advances of science and technology and the progress of human civilization. As the era of worldwide low-carbon economy has dawned, glass will play a greater role in clean energy, industrial transformation and infrastructural building, becoming a “bridge” to connect us to an international community with a shared future, and contributing the “power of glass” to the global response to climate change and the building of a sustainable society.

10:30 - 11:00 AM
 Glass Creates Value

Ilkay Sökmen

Glass Creates Value

Glass, one of the materials that have changed the history of humanity, is among the products of the future enabling innovative and sustainable solutions for many sectors in addition to its traditional uses. The glass industry, which provides long-term value with its constantly developing and expanding usage areas, promises endless potential in creating a sustainable future. Once it has been transformed to be a product in the form of a container, tableware, architectural or automotive application, glass is one the most environmentally neutral, safe and functional material we use. Based on this, the presentation will provide informations about innovative glass products that contribute to sustainable growth and add value to life, such as automotive and architectural glasses with functional coatings that provide significant energy savings by reducing heating and cooling needs, antireflective architectural glasses, antimicrobial glassware, the world's thinnest yet most durable glassware and 100% recyclable glassware.

11:00 - 11:20 AM

Coffee break

11:20 - 11:50 AM
 Sustainability Framework and the Role of Science  and Technology

Florian Kongoli

Sustainability Framework and the Role of Science and Technology

The sustainability framework with its 3 main pillars (1) science & technology (2) governance & management, and (3) education & civil society will be presented along with its applications in various fields such as glass, materials science and engineering, recycling and landfilling, economic linearity and circularity as well as automation. The essential and irreplaceable role of science and technology in sustainability and circular economy in glass industry will be highlighted.

11:50 - 12:20 AM
 The role of sustainable glass packaging in the circular economy

Vitaliano Torno

The role of sustainable glass packaging in the circular economy

The world is moving from a take-make-dispose model to a circular economy where only products and materials which are re-useable and infinitely recyclable over and over again will make environmental and business sense. Glass is a permanent material that is good for the planet, people and society. For over 50 years, our industry has been a Circular Economy pioneer at the heart of a closed loop production system. By 2030 our industry wants to collect 90% of all glass packaging put on the market and by 2050 become a climate neutral packaging system. Our industry goals perfectly match with UN Goals 11 and 12.

12:20 - 12:50 PM
 Sustainability in the flat glass sector: a solid track record to transform an industry vision into reality

Philippe Bastien

Sustainability in the flat glass sector: a solid track record to transform an industry vision into reality

Glass is a unique material going through the centuries thanks to its continuous evolution and adaptability to the needs of people (safety, security, comfort, etc.) and to those of societies as they evolve towards greater energy and environmental conservation. These adaptations were made possible by the glass industry, which embraced these challenges to deliver solutions meeting new architectural and automotive trends.
More than ever, the industry is ready to take up the sustainability challenge and to contribute to the fullest to the transition towards a climate neutral Europe. The European flat glass sector takes it as its role to produce the materials essential for renovating Europe’s buildings, for supporting the clean mobility transition and for increasing the share of renewable solar energy in Europe. While already providing net carbon-avoidance products, the flat glass sector is looking into ways to massively scale up its contributions to the EU’s climate neutrality objective, including by developing novel ways to lower its industrial emissions. Philippe Bastien will give an overview of the glass industry evolution and how the industry takes up this sustainability challenge.

12:50 - 1:20 PM
 Furnace of the future

Erik Muijsenberg

Furnace of the future

With the realities of global warming and plans for CO2 reduction, the interest in alternative furnace designs such as hybrid electric melting is getting more attention. The generation of electricity by renewable energy sources is, of course, a great help as it brings costs of electricity finally down and will be CO2 free. In Europe the average generation of electricity by renewable resources is already above 40% coming from wind, solar, hydro and bio. Electricity storage however is complex and expensive, while transporting energy in the form of a gas via pipes is cheaper than via electric wires. An alternative renewable energy carrier is hydrogen. Hydrogen can be generated via electrolysis using electricity: this conversion, however, is only in the effective range of 65%. After this, hydrogen can be burned in a glass melting furnace with a typical efficiency of 50%. This paper will present Glass Service a.s. (GS) thermal efficiency studies showing if the future will be more likely using electric heating or hydrogen combustion. Results of mathematical modeling show the efficiency of the different technologies. What will be the furnace design of the future?

1:20 - 2:30 PM

Lunch Break

2:30 - 3:00 PM
 Recent advances in glass physics and the glass science landscape in India

Srikanth Sastry

Recent advances in glass physics and the glass science landscape in India

Computational and theoretical investigations of the properties of glass formers and glasses have witnessed significant advances in recent years, leading to new insights regarding the glass transition and the properties of glasses, specifically their mechanical and yielding behavior. Improved methodologies have been developed for modeling and simulating these phenomena. Some of these developments will be reviewed. In addition, a broad perspective of the glass science and technology landscape in India will also be presented.

3:00 - 3:20 PM
 Glass education worldwide through formal courses and research

Edgar Zanotto

Glass education worldwide through formal courses and research

We will start with the history of glass education, including large pioneering groups in Jena, Alfred, Sheffield, and Leningrad (St. Petersburg), which started in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Then we will cover glass education developments throughout 2021 with statistics and discussions about the vital role of formal academic courses (passive learning) and research projects (active learning) as the building blocks for training skilled engineers and researchers. As a bonus to the attendees, we will finish with entertaining urban legends often used to attract students to the glass field, such as: Do medieval stained-glass windows flow along the centuries? Is there any explanation for the sacred images that appear in glass windows worldwide? Is it possible to shatter a glass window with a bare voice?

3:20 - 3:40 PM
 Education in Glass Art and Science - challenges of transdisciplinarity

Márcia Vilarigues

Education in Glass Art and Science - challenges of transdisciplinarity

In a world of rapidly changing technologies, internationalization, and market forces, we oftentimes lose track of the value of human creativity. Developing cultured minds and skilled hands have been a hallmark of the truly great civilisations throughout history, and glass has been a material through which we have witnessed the ongoing struggles and successes of human endeavor. Whether we look to lenses and medical apparatus, a simple teacup, or a sculpture for an emperor, glass has played a central role in the development of human culture and technology. We work to guide our students to their highest creative potentials through hands-on practice in glass making. Moreover, we strive to assist in the development of our students’ awareness of themselves as participants in the ever-developing social fabric of which they are a part. Individual creativity and maker’s practice is balanced against scientific knowledge and a sense of place within history.

3:40 - 4:00 PM
 Empowering the industry through education and collaboration

Corinne Claireaux

Empowering the industry through education and collaboration

Following the natural aging of our population, a generation of loyal and highly skilled experts will soon retire from the glass industry. We must prepare for the arrival of the next generation with its different view on work and an inexhaustible drive for finding purpose. Besides this, the skills needed for the future might be different: digitalization, data analytics, sustainability, decarbonization will require a diversification of the workforce, and meeting these needs is already a concern. Female employees still account for a large minority of the workforce. Now is the time for the glass industry to tackle age and gender diversity issues and to take advantage of the associated growth opportunities. Learning and development strategies are critical to increase diversity, create engagement, and empower glass people to face tomorrow’s environmental challenges today.

4:00 - 4:30 PM
 From Magic to Science…and Back

Jeffrey Evenson

From Magic to Science…and Back

Extraordinary aesthetic and technical properties have made glass one of the most transformative materials of all time. People once believed these properties were the result of magic. Today, our deep understanding of glass science not only explains these phenomena, but also allows researchers to unleash new capabilities that were once unimaginable. Dr. Evenson will explain why the pace of glass innovation is accelerating, share examples of how glass technologies can solve some of the world’s toughest problems, and discuss why he believes the most exciting glass discoveries are still ahead.

4:00 - 4:30 PM
 Nature of Pâte de verre

Kimiake Higuchi

Nature of Pâte de verre

I am going to talk about my first encounter with glass, how I came to work with glass, my creative activities in the forest environment, my works, the feelings I felt there, the reflections I gained from the voices of the forest, and my wishes for the future.

5:00 - 5:30 PM

Closing session

VITRUM/GIMAV - Dino Zandonella Necca

CTIEC - Peng Shou

AGC - Naoki Sugimoto

Corning - Jeff Evenson

Sisecam - Ahmet Kirman

Reinhard Conradt, President of the ICG

5:30 - onwards

Press Conference

Don't miss this historic event! Watch the opening ceremony online

Due to COVID-related capacity restrictions, there are limited seats for the physical event. However, no matter where you are across the globe, you can stream the opening ceremony live online, starting 10th February 2021 at 8:30 AM (GMT+1) using the link below